Using dialogical/performance analysis to assess the suitability and acceptability of social isolation and loneliness interventions for older minoritised people living in the UK, Brenda Hayanga, UCL Institute of Education.

 

Tuesday 4th February 2020, 5– 6.30pm

Library, Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27 – 28 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA

All welcome, particularly graduate students.

 Storytelling is first of all a way of speaking by a storyteller to an audience in a social situation – in a word, a performance (Langellier, 1989:249). People narrate their stories for a variety of reasons. For some, stories are a way to relay information. For others, stories are also an act of self-presentation. They allow people to, for example, construct who they are and perform their identity. In this study, I adopt a performance approach to personal narratives. I re-use qualitative data and draw upon narrative analysis to assess whether interventions for social isolation and loneliness are suitable and acceptable for older people from minoritised ethnic groups living in the UK. Specifically, I use dialogic/performance analysis to identify how participants use various narration styles and linguistic performance features to present and position themselves. This approach to narrative analysis can reveal participants’ attitudes and enables insight into what participants may deem appropriate, suitable, and/or acceptable. By attending to the broader cultural, historical, and social context, I explore whether these performances conform to, or resist canonical narratives. In doing so, I assess the transferability of the findings to other older, minoritised people.

This study is the fourth phase of an iterative mixed-methods study, which aims to investigate the effectiveness and suitability of social isolation and loneliness interventions for older minoritised people living in the UK. It follows on from the third phase, where I conducted a systematic review of social isolation and loneliness interventions for older people. For this analysis, I draw upon qualitative data from the second phase, where I conducted in-depth interviews with older minoritised people. The debates surrounding re-use of qualitative are discussed, as are the strengths and limitations of dialogic/performance analysis to assess the suitability and appropriateness of social isolation and loneliness interventions for this population. Not only does this study contribute to the sparse research in this area, but it also illustrates the advantages and feasibility of using narrative analysis in mixed methods research designs.

Brenda Hayanga: I am a PhD student based at UCL Institute of Education, Department of Social Science. My research straddles two fields; social gerontology and race/ethnicity studies. My main research interests are diversity in ageing, intersectionality, generalisability, mixed methods and evidence-based policy and practice.

For further details, please contact Corinne Squire at c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Brenda Hayanga, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, brenda.hayanga.14@ucl.ac.uk . Details are also on the CNR blog https://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com and the CNR website

The development of emerging plurisexual identities across three generations of sexual minority individuals, Marc Svensson, UCL

 

Tuesday 21st January 2020, 5– 6.30 pm

Library, Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27 – 28 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA

 

All welcome, particularly graduate students.

Abstract: This paper is looking at 31 individuals across three generations, from a large nationwide US study called the Generation Study (http://www.generations-study.com), identifying with a plurisexual emerging sexual identity, namely queer or pansexual. Semi-structured interviews have been carried out and the data analysed to identify minority stress factors and resilience resources impacting this specific sexual minority group, influencing their (mental) health outcomes.

 

Marc Svensson: As a social psychologist, my research interests centres around improving mental health and the general well-being of minority and marginalised groups. My research focuses on understanding and analysing minority identity formation in its social context, and its subsequent role in mental health outcomes. I am currently completing my PhD at UCL (University College London) where I am researching young people with a non-binary sexual identity (pansexual and queer) as well as bisexual individuals, as these groups report even lower general wellbeing and suffer from more mental health issues than their gay and lesbian peers within the sexual minority community.

I am also the co-founder of a tech start-up called Helsa. Helsa is a digital platform for LGBTQ+ people to learn about their own mental health and match them with the right support for their specific needs.

 

For further details, please contact Corinne Squire at c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Brenda Hayanga, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, brenda.hayanga.14@ucl.ac.uk . Details are also on the CNR blog https://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com/2017/10/01/cnr-tcru-october-graduate-seminar-emily-le-roux-rutledge-public-narratives-as-symbolic-resources-for-gender-and-development/ and the CNR website

December TCRU-CNR seminar: ‘Narrated city’

‘Narrated City’: Using a narrative-ethnographic-grounded approach in urban design studies. A case study from Yazd, Iran

Fatemeh Rostami, University of East London

Tuesday 17th December 2019, 5– 7pm

Library, Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27 – 28 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA

All welcome, particularly graduate students.

‘Narrated City’ discusses the outcome of PhD research in the realm of urban design studies. The paper explores how an urban place is related to and imagined by its inhabitants, using Yazd, a traditional Iranian desert city, as a case study. The overall aim of this research was to contribute a new urban methodology in which the social fabrics of cities are truly involved in future urban studies and developments. There is an ongoing discussion amongst Iranian designers and government regarding contemporary urban issues of traditional cities that arise due to the lack of an efficient and accepted urban methodology. Regarding this matter, some research has been done analysing the physical fabrics of the cities.  However, there is a lack of social involvement in that work, for which this research attempts to compensate. To do so, a combination of four inductive social methodologies – case study, grounded theory, ethnography, narrative – was used to analyse the city at different levels, from that of the individual to that of the city itself. The city of Yazd was chosen for this investigation because of its diverse urban morphology composed of historic, old, and new fabrics, which provided opportunities to listen to the voices of residents living in older and contemporary urban places. From each part of the city, a neighbourhood was chosen to be studied in detail. More than 400 residents of these areas participated through interviewing and completing questionnaires. The researcher lived within each community in order to study the place ethnographically. The research findings, the outcome of the combined four inductive social methodologies, show that each area is dominated by a certain circumstance, while there are socio-cultural inter-relationships amongst these areas indicating that residents require the existence of all areas. To hear residents’ opinions regarding the research findings, a public seminar was organized in Yazd. The seminar showed that local inhabitants and professionals, as well as local authorities, agreed with the findings. This research contributes a new urban methodology entitled the ‘narrative- ethnographic-grounded approach’ for the future urban planning and design of traditional Iranian cities.

Fatemeh Rostami is an Iranian native currently living in London. She has recently completed her PhD in architecture (urban design). Presently, she is auditing urban theory and design classes in order to enhance her knowledge of teaching skills. She enjoys travelling and researching so that she can learn more about various local cultures and urban places.

 

For further details, please contact Corinne Squire at c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Carolina Guttierez Munoz, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, carolina.gutierrez.16@ucl.ac.uk . Details are also on the CNR blog https://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com/2017/10/01/cnr-tcru-october-graduate-seminar-emily-le-roux-rutledge-public-narratives-as-symbolic-resources-for-gender-and-development/ and the CNR website

TCRU-CNR November 5 2019 seminar: Narratives of fatherhood in family lives in Lahore, Pakistan. Nehaal Bajwa, University of Sussex.

My research, within the field of psycho-social studies, involves six families’ narratives about their everyday lives, fathers’ own biographies and stories from childhood, and observations in these households, as well as personal experiences in Lahore and informal discussions with people on the subject of gender, parenting, family life, and childhood. Central to my approach is a focus on the everyday ‘doing’ of family life (Morgan, 2011) and a belief that families (including fathers) do their best for their children, and have a working (if flexible) concept of what a ‘good childhood’ should look like. Narratives are understood to give fathers’ and families’ everyday practices meaning in the context of their structural environments, both presently and in providing information about the experiences and environments over the life course that inform their contemporary ideas about their family life – Gillis’ ‘families we live by’ (1997). In this paper I will trace space, place, and geography in families’ narratives of their everyday lives to ask what functions ‘space’ performs, or is believed to perform, in shaping practices of fathering, identities, and gendered experiences of family life in Lahore. I will focus on family narratives of ‘[doing it] together’; ‘getting separate’ from or living together with paternal in-laws; the effects that rural life in the village is thought to have on children’s development; the home as environment; gendered space and women’s and girls’ mobility; and the role of the family in mediating the effects of socio-geographical limits.

Gillis, J. R. 1997. A World of Their Own Making: Myth, Ritual, and the Quest for Family Values. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Morgan, D. 2011. Rethinking Family Practices. London: Palgrave MacMillan.

Nehaal Bajwa is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Education at the University of Sussex. Nehaal’s thesis focuses on the narratives and practices of fathering and family life in early childhood in Lahore, a large city in Pakistan.

For further details, please contact Corinne Squire at c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Brenda Hayanga, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, Brenda.hayanga.14@ucl.ac.uk.

CNR – TCRU: Postgraduate Narrative Research Seminars 2019-2020: UPDATE!         

CNR-TCRU Postgraduate Narrative Research Seminars 2019-2020                        

Organised by the Centre for Narrative Research (CNR), University of East London  

and the Thomas Coram Research Unit (TCRU), UCL Institute of Education                      

All seminars take place at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27-28 Woburn Square,

London WC1H 0AA, usually from 5 -6.30pm.

All are welcome, particularly graduate students.

 

October 8: Xu Liu, Sichuan Normal University and UCL Institute of Education, and David Burnett, OCMS College, Oxford. Insider-Outsider: Reflections on cooperative fieldwork in a village in the West of China. *Starting at 5.30pm*

 

November 5: Nehaal Bajwa, University of Sussex. Narratives of fatherhood in family lives in Lahore, Pakistan.

 

December 3: Fatemeh Rostami, UEL. A Place of culture: A narrative-ethnographic-grounded approach for analysing traditional Iranian cities. Case study: Yazd, Iran.

 

February 4: Brenda Hayanga, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, UCL. The effectiveness and appropriateness of interventions to address social isolation and loneliness in older minoritised people living in the UK. 

 

March 3: Jade Levell, Open University/University of Bournemouth. Competing and changing masculinities in narratives: Findings from research into the life-stories of men who experienced domestic violence in childhood and became involved in gangs.

 

May 5: Jeroen Royal College of Art. We are not ourselves all of the time and we are not all of ourselves at any time: Heteronyms, personas and contemporary art.

 

June 9: Michelle Harewood, University of East London. Speaking without words: silent narratives of Notting Hill Carnival.

 

Seminar details are announced on CNR and TCRU mailing lists two weeks before the seminar date. For more details, please contact Corinne Squire, CNR, c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Brenda Hayanga, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, brenda.hayanga.14@ucl.ac.uk . Details are also on the CNR blog https://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com/ and the CNR website

 

Graduate research seminar, TCRU and CNR, 08.10.19

Insider-Outsider: Reflections on cooperative fieldwork in a village in the West of China

 

Xu Liu, Sichuan Normal University and UCL Institute of Education, and

David Burnett, Sichuan Normal University and OCMS College Oxford.

 

Tuesday 8th October 2019, 5.30 – 7pm

 

Library, Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27 – 28 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA

All welcome, particularly graduate students.

 

This presentation is based on reflections and experiences faced during cooperative fieldwork in a village in the south of Sichuan Province, West China by two researchers, one Chinese and the other English. The research has recently been published in a book named after the village, Golden Goose (Palgrave 2019). The researchers explored different aspects of the local culture including government, education, marriage, gender, business, migration, medicine and agriculture. One major theme was how the lives of Chinese peasants have changed during the last 100 years and how this change was understood by the people themselves. The oldest members of the community were not literate and spoke a distinct dialect of Chinese, which required that interviews be translated from the dialect to Mandarin and then to English. This was possible because the Chinese researcher spoke the dialect and was known to the community. We therefore entered the community, one as an ‘insider’ and the other as an ‘outsider’, which had advantages but also some unforeseen difficulties. The narratives of the various individuals were written in a manner that sought to capture the perspective and feelings of each person. Through the research, lessons were learnt about objectivity, integrity, confidentiality and informed consent while undertaking narrative research in intercultural settings.

Xu Liu is an Associate Professor in Education at the Sichuan Normal University in China. She studied for her doctorate at UCL Institute of Education, finishing in 2018. Her research topic was the governance of private universities in China. Xu has published a number of papers in both Chinese and English. She is currently doing post-doctoral research at IOE.

David Burnett gained his PhD from SOAS and has been involved in research projects in social change in Uganda and Ghana. He was invited to be professor of Anthropology at Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu in 2006 where he is now Profesor Emeritus and where he taught Social Anthropology and helped with research projects among the Jiarong Tibetans in Sichuan.  He is the author of several books including Western Civilization: A Study for Chinese Students and Jiarong: Continuity and Change. He retired from SNU in 2013 and now lives in Reading. He continues to supervise PhD students at OCMS college Oxford.

 

For further details, please contact Corinne Squire at c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Carolina Guttierez Munoz, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, carolina.gutierrez.16@ucl.ac.uk . Details are also on the CNR blog https://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com/2017/10/01/cnr-tcru-october-graduate-seminar-emily-le-roux-rutledge-public-narratives-as-symbolic-resources-for-gender-and-development/ and the CNR website

CNR – TCRU graduate seminars, 2019-20

CNR-TCRU Postgraduate Narrative Research Seminars, 2019-2020

Organised by Centre for Narrative Research (CNR), University of East London

and Thomas Coram Research Unit (TCRU), UCL Institute of Education

 

All seminars take place at the Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27-28 Woburn Square,

London WC1H 0AA, usually from 5 -6.30pm.

All are welcome, particularly graduate students.

 

October 8: Xu Liu, Sichuan Normal University and UCL Institute of Education, and David Burnett, OCMS College, Oxford. Insider-Outsider: Reflections on cooperative fieldwork in a village in the West of China. *Starting at 5.30pm*

 

November 5: Nehaal Bajwa, University of Sussex. TBA.

 

December 3: Fatemeh Rostami, UEL. Narrated City: Using a narrative-ethnographic-grounded approach in urban design studies. Case study: Yazd, Iran.

 

 

February 4: Brenda Hayanga, Thomas Coram Research Unit, Institute of Education, UCL. The effectiveness and appropriateness of interventions to address social isolation and loneliness in older minoritised people living in the UK. 

 

March 3: Jade Levell, Open University/University of Bournemouth. Competing and changing masculinities in narratives: Findings from research into the life-stories of men who experienced domestic violence in childhood and became involved in gangs.

 

May 5: Jeroen Royal College of Art. We are not ourselves all of the time and we are not all of ourselves at any time: Heteronyms, personas and contemporary art.

 

June 9: Michelle Harewood, University of East London. Speaking without words: silent narratives of Notting Hill Carnival.

 

Seminar details are announced on CNR and TCRU mailing lists two weeks before the seminar date. For more details, please contact Corinne Squire, CNR, c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Carolina Guttierez Munoz, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, carolina.gutierrez.16@ucl.ac.uk . Details are also on the CNR blog https://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com/ and the CNR website

May 29th, 2019: Amor narratio: A celebration of the 80th birthday and the life and work of Cathy Riessman

In honour of the eightieth birthday of Catherine Kohler Riessman, a central figure in narrative research internationally for three decades, Greenwich University’s Centre for Research on Employment and Work (CREW), UCL’s Thomas Coram Research Unit (TCRU), and UEL’s Centre for Narrative Research (CNR) and Feminist Research Group (FRG) were delighted to host a symposium, ‘Amor Narratio’, to celebrate her life, career and narrative scholarship, on May 29, 2019, at Greenwich University, London.
This was a delightful and crowded day, which brought together international scholars for presentations and discussions that reflected on and illuminated Riessman’s work, and also that of the field of narrative research generally.

Pictured: Riessman and Maria Tamboukou, one of the key organisers along with Ruth Ballardie of Greenwich University); Riessman with Lars-Christer Hyden and Paul Atkinson; Wendy Luttrell, Hyden, Molly Andrews and Ann Phoenix.

May 28th: Graduate students and Cathy Riessman in conversation

Reiessman graduate seminar

This afternoon, Prof Cathy Riessman, prior to the ‘Amor Narratio’ event for her 80th birthday, met with a group of graduate students to discuss their and her research, directions in narrative research – a wonderful afternoon, with many possibilities opening up in the work of these young scholars.

May 14th, graduate seminar: Positionality of the ‘self’ in stories of Zambian teachers living with HIV and ART: Sanny Mulubale, UEL/UNZA

CNR-TCRU Postgraduate Narrative Research Seminars, 2018-2019

 Centre for Narrative Research (CNR), University of East London

and the Thomas Coram Research Unit (TCRU), UCL Institute of Education

 

Critical citizens: Positionality of the ‘Self’ in stories of Zambian teachers living with HIV and on antiretroviral therapy (ART)

Sanny Mulubale, University of East London and University of Zambia

Tuesday 14th May 2019, 5 – 6.30pm

Library, Thomas Coram Research Unit, 27 – 28 Woburn Square, London WC1H 0AA

All welcome, particularly graduate students.

 

Identity is often told through socially positioned narratives that take a biographical approach. Biomedical studies, though, tend to portray the ‘self’ of people with chronic illnesses from the physiological and clinical perspectives of effective diagnosis, treatment and care. Such perspectives may not provide adequate models for people with chronic illnesses to theorize, perform and live selfhood. Semi-structured interviews with 41 HIV positive teachers in Zambia aged between 25 – 55 were conducted in an attempt to explore narrated sense of ‘self’ for individuals with HIV and on antiretroviral therapy (ART).  A thematic analysis operating at three levels and using elements of discourse analysis was employed. The aim of this presentation is to explore ways through which HIV positive teachers position themselves in their stories of life on ART, and important framings of ‘critical citizenship’ that emerge. A treatable illness, HIV has both latent and visible psychological, social and economic effects on infected and affected individuals (Lichtenstein 2015:858; Squire 2013). The paper suggests that the positionality of the self in stories of living with this treatable though not curable virus, offers powerful tools for understanding everyday lives on ART.  In this study, the unending treatment practices around HIV were associated with, for instance, positionings within a supportive biomedical citizen-state contract around HIV treatment, in relation to de/professionalisation, in relation to ‘accepting’ or resisting lifelong medication, and as a citizen within ‘pharmaceutical colonialism’. The overall argument in this paper is that ‘self’ narrative among HIV positive teachers in Zambia appear to be shaped by the importance of community-based health care, by past experiences and present events, and by ongoing uncertainties about their desired futures. The identity entanglements and fragmentations of selfhood under contemporary biomedicine and biopolitics seem to be pivotal for critical HIV citizens such as the participants in this study.

Keywords: Citizenship, Positionality, Narrative, Citizenship, HIV, Self, Health, Positionality, Zambia

Sanny Mulubale is a graduate from the University of Sheffield’s politics department and University of Zambia (UNZA). He is currently a 2016 Commonwealth Scholar studying for a PhD at the University of East London. He is a lecturer at UNZA in civic education and a researcher with keen interest in identity, citizenship, global politics and the govermentalisation of health. His work has been in and within learning institutions, government departments, non-governmental organizations, research institutes, and community-based initiatives. His fascination is with the nexus between theory and empirical evidence in both research and policy frameworks. His research has appeared in both local and international journals.

For further details, please contact Corinne Squire at c.squire@uel.ac.uk or Carolina Guttierez Munoz, Thomas Coram Research Unit graduate partner, carolina.gutierrez.16@ucl.ac.uk .Details are also on the CNR bloghttps://centrefornarrativeresearch.wordpress.com/2017/10/01/cnr-tcru-october-graduate-seminar-emily-le-roux-rutledge-public-narratives-as-symbolic-resources-for-gender-and-development/ and the CNR website